Color Blast Sweet Potato + Red Onion Stir Fry

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This recipe is: Paleo + AIP (Autoimmune Protocol) + Whole30 + vegan + coconut free

J U M P   T O   T H E   R E C I P E !

This simple, flavorful stir fry features anti-oxidant rich root vegetables to keep you warm and nourished throughout the colder months. The beautiful colors are a feast for the eyes and signal a variety important phytonutrients to support seasonal wellness. 

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Last month, Seattle was hit with a massive snow storm. When people heard about the expected 8 plus inches of snow and temps as low as 12 degrees, it was quickly dubbed the “Snowpacolapse.”

Sure, that doesn’t compare to what most of the US endured this winter (it was colder in Chicago than Antartica at one point) but by Seattle standards, that’s a panic-inducing blizzard.

We’d literally just moved into our new home when the snow started falling and our brand new fridge was completely empty. So I sent Wonderhubs out into the cold with a shopping list that basically read: “everything.” However, in preparation for snowiest Seattle winter in decades, people had rushed to stock up on groceries, leaving the store aisles eerily empty in their wake.

When Wonderhubs returned home, he had almost nothing from my list. What he had managed to snag was two bags of sweet potatoes and a bag of red onions. Because apparently those are vegetables people will pass on, even if it’s Snowmaggedon and the produce section looks like plague of locus blew through it.

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My Color Blast Sweet Potato + Red Onion Stir Fry recipe was born of necessity given that produce wise, we didn’t have a lot of options. But ever since I’ve been making often. My body just craves those nutrient dense, deep hued colors!

So thank you Epic Seattle Snow Storm. Now I’ve got a new recipe staple and hopefully you will too.

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When we know that what we’re eating supports healing it makes a difference–because intention is everything! Check out the medicinal benefits of this recipe’s ingredients or jump to the recipe now.IMG_6597Water → I know it might seem silly to mention this, but we’re 75% water so water’s kinda important. Tap water has all kinds of scary stuff in it & cheap plastic filters (even if they’re BPA-free) just don’t cut it when it comes to filtration. That’s why we saved up & got a Berky water filter. I know Berky’s are a bit spendy, but believe me: they’re worth it.

Kosher Salt → I like to use Kosher salt for larger cooking tasks like salting water. Diamond Crystal is my fave brand for its flavor and texture, and also because it doesn’t contain gross anti-caking additives. 

Sweet Potatoes → Sweet potatoes are an abundant source of beta-carotene (Vitamin A) which is essential in helping the body fight off infections. They also have a concentrations of potassium, which regulates fluid balance in the body and controls the heart’s electrical activity (making them a great food if you have POTS!)

Red Onions → Red onions contain the largest amounts of disease fighting flavonols and anthocyanins of any veggie in the onion family. Eating red onions enhances detoxification pathways, increases overall immunity, and has been shown to suppresses cancer cell growth and development.

Olive Oil → You can honestly use whatever oil you love most. I tend to use extra virgin olive oil for most of my cooking, but coconut or avocado (if AIP) or sunflower (if not) would also be fine.

Salt → I use Redmond’s Real Salt because it contains minerals & trace minerals necessary for good health. Also, it’s delicious. I used to buy it in small packs but now I buy it in bulk, which saves me some cash & cuts down on waste.

Fresh Lemon Juice → Adding lemon juice to dishes lowers their glycemic index making it a great addition to recipes with starches like this one. It also improves digestion and activates digestive enzymes in your liver.

Cilantro → Including cilantro can help rid heavy metals like mercury and lead from your body. It also contains phytochemicals that protect against oxidative damage.

SPRO.3rd.50.jpgIMG_6599 Serves: 4 | Total recipe time: 18 min | Prep time: 7 | Standing time if following Fatigue Friendly Instructions: 7 minutes | Difficulty rating: 🥄🥄

💚 2 cups filtered water

💚 1 tablespoon Kosher salt (or 2 teaspoons sea salt)

💚 3 small sweet potatoes (about 1 lb total)

💚 1/2 a big-mama (1 lb) red onion 

💚 1 tablespoon olive oil

💚 1/4 teaspoon salt

💚 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

💚 1/3 cup fresh cilantro leaves 

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Add 2 cups of filtered water and 1 tablespoon Kosher salt in a large pot with a lid and bring to a boil over high heat.

Meanwhile, peel the sweet potatoes til you see the bright orange inner flesh.

Then cut the sweet potatoes into fry-style pieces (about 1/2”) like so…

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Once the water is boiling, add the sweet potatoes and set a timer for 5 minutes.

Okay, back to the cutting board! Cut the top end of the red onion off and peel away its papery outer skins. Then cut it in half. With the cut side facing down, cut the onios into 1/2” slices along the grain. Finally cut off the end. (Save the other half for another recipe.)

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Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat.

When it’s nice and toasty, add the onions and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Stir the coat the onions in the oil and salt, then continue to sauté them, stirring every minute or so. Your goal: to get a little color on the onions while keeping them a bit crunchy.

Meanwhile (or whenever you get a chance) pick 1/3 cup cilantro leaves.

When the timer goes off, drain the sweet potatoes into a colander in the sink. Let ‘em sit for a minute to allow excess moisture to evaporate off.

Add the sweet potatoes to the skillet and toss/stir to mix ‘em with the onions and get them coated with oil. Mmmm-mmmm love those colors!

Now grab the lemon and roll it back and forth it get it nice and juicy before cutting it open.

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Squeeze some lemon juice into the skillet (about 1 tablespoon) and add the cilantro leaves (save a few for garnish.)

Stir to mix and check it out: the lemon juice gives the onions gorgeous fuchsia highlights!

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Plate up and garnish with the remaining cilantro.

✨ You did it! Congratulate yourself on cooking up healing food, give thanks and ENJOY!

The next set of instructions was lovingly adapted for folks experiencing chronic fatigue. If you’d like to skip it click HERE to get to the rest of the post.

IMG_6603This is a pretty simple recipe, but it does involve a fair bit of cutting. It also requires being able to carry a pot of water from the sink to the stove and back. To conserve your energy, you can sit down while doing the prep work (or delegate it to a sous chef if you have one hanging around.)

Here’s instructions based on how I prepared this recipe using a stool in the kitchen to sit on:

Add 2 cups of filtered water and 1 tablespoon Kosher salt in a large pot with a lid and bring to a boil over high heat.

Grab the sweet potatoes, onion, and lemon and set out a cutting board, knife and peeling at a counter. Pull up a seat and get cozy for a bit of prep work.

Peel the sweet potatoes til you see the bright orange inner flesh.

Then cut the sweet potatoes into fry-style pieces like this:

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Roll the lemon under your palm to make it juicier and cut it in half. 

Once the water is boiling, get up and add the sweet potatoes, setting a timer for 5 minutes. Then return to sitting.

Cut the top end of the onion off and peel away its papery outer skins. Then cut it in half. With the cut side facing down, cut the onios into 1/2” slices along the grain. Finally cut off the end. (Save the other half for another recipe.)

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Okay, sauté time! This part’s easiest if you can move your seat next to the stove.

Add 1 tablespoon olive oil to a large skillet over medium heat. 

When it’s nice and toasty, add the onions and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Stir the coat the onions in the oil and salt, then continue to sauté them, stirring every minute or so. Your goal: to get a little color on the onions while keeping them a bit crunchy. Meanwhile, pick some cilantro leaves from the stems for garnishing while you sit.

When the timer goes off, drain the sweet potatoes into a colander in the sink. Go ahead and let ‘em sit for a minute to allow excess moisture to evaporate off.

Add the sweet potatoes to the skillet and stir to mix ‘em with the onions and oil. Mmmm-mmmm love those colors!

Now grab the lemon and roll it back and forth it get it nice and juicy before cutting it open.

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Squeeze some lemon juice into the skillet (about 1 tablespoon) and add the cilantro leaves (save a few for garnish.)

Stir to mix and check it out: the lemon juice gives the onions gorgeous fuchsia highlights!

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Plate up and garnish with the remaining cilantro.

✨ You did it! Congratulate yourself on cooking up healing food, give thanks and ENJOY!

IMG_6601If you’ve got pots and pans large enough to cook up a double batch, go right ahead! Boiling more sweet potatoes is easy if you’ve got a large pot, but you’ll wanna use two skillets going at once for the final sautéing (or a big ‘ol wok) because daaaaang that’s a lotta veggies.

This dish is good cold, and as long as your okay with onion breath, is great for packed lunches. To reheat leftovers from the fridge return to a skillet on the stove and stir over medium-low.

You can also freeze extra portions. Defrost them the fridge first and then reheat. I recommend adding more fresh cilantro leaves to “freshen” up any leftovers.IMG_6600🔹 To upgrade this tasty veggie side to a a hearty main dish, add seasoned shredded chicken during the final sauté and serve with avocado slices.

🔹 If you’re eating plant based, top it with warm refried beans before garnishing with the cilantro (and any other yummy toppings you’d like—Wonderhubs likes to add cheese and green chilis!)IMG_6598Having a sparse fridge and pantry during the week of the storm was a powerful opportunity to cultivate compassion for those who struggle with food scarcity. And while all that snow was certainly inconvenient for us, we had a warm home to shelter us from it. Far too many of my fellow Seattlities were on the streets.

As you prepare this recipe and sit down to enjoy it, I invite you to look around give thanks for the good things in your life that may be easy to overlook.

Like shelter. And sweet potatoes. 

May you eat well, live well & enjoy a New Wellness.

Mittens & Hugs,

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What’s one thing you’re feeling grateful for today?

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“Gratitude turns what we have into enough.” ~ Melodie Beattie

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Handy-dandy links for products related to this recipe (click the pic):

          

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S O U R C E S:

https://lacanadacarecenter.com/15-health-benefits-of-sweet-potatoes-according-to-science/

https://www.oola.com/life-in-flavor/2398681/should-you-avoid-eating-sweet-potato-skins/

https://thetruthaboutcancer.com/health-benefits-red-onion/

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/06/26/organic-red-onions.aspx

https://www.naturalfoodseries.com/15-health-benefits-lemon-juice/

https://thegoodinside.com/7-health-benefits-of-cilantro/

Some of the links in this post may be “affiliate links.” Click HERE to learn more about what that means. I’m letting you know ’cause honesty & trust are important, and I want you to know what’s going on when you click my links. Xx Kat

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