Real Cinnamon Walnut Latte

{Paleo, Ketogenic, Vegan}

IMG_7611

A low carb, high fat, creamy iced latte with notes of nutty sweetness.

I love strong, black iced coffee. However, since adopting a ketogenic diet to help myself heal from the neurological aspects of Lyme Disease, I’ve been experimenting with different “bulletproof” coffee drinks. Essentially, the term “bulletproof” refers to blending your coffee with fats (specifically grass-fed butter and coconut oil.)

It’s not my fave. For somewhat mysterious reasons, I just don’t like butter in my coffee. So I’ve been playing around with adding other high quality fats to my homemade coldbrew coffee.

While most of my diet follows the Autoimmune Protocol version of Paleo, I now include some high quality nut and seed oils. I’ve found that I tolerate these, and have benefited from the increase in monounsaturated fats they provide. I’m so grateful to have healed to the point where I can increasingly diversify my diet.

I’m a firm believer in sourcing nutrients from the widest possible range of foods: diversity isn’t just the spice of life, it’s a foundation of wellness. 

My Real Cinnamon Walnut Latte offers real food nutrition. More importantly it’s delicious: all the creaminess you’d want in a high fat latte, with a subtle nuttiness and hint of warming sweetness. The inclusion of walnut oil provides the minerals manganese and copper, as well as omega 3, 6, and 9 essential fats.

Surprisingly, walnut oil also includes melatonin, the hormone we can thank for regulating our bodies’ sleep-wake cycles. Walnuts and their oil furthermore contain selenium, phosphorous, magnesium, and zinc.

Did you know that most “Cinnamon” sold in the United States is actually Cassia? True Cinnamon, also know as Ceylon Cinnamon or Mexican Cinnamon,  has a softer, sweeter flavor and is a powerful superfood. According the ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) scale, 1 teaspoon of Ceylon Cinnamon contains more anti-oxidants than an 8 oz glass of pomegranate juice!

Another reason to track down real Ceylon Cinnamon is that the commonly sold Cassia Cinnamon contains high levels of Coumarin, a substance known to cause liver damage. Ceylon Cinnamon, on the other hand, has ultra low Coumarin levels and is completely safe for daily consumption.

The sticks on the left are Cassia, on the right is Real Ceylon Cinnamon.

The sticks on the left are Cassia, on the right is Real Ceylon Cinnamon.

How can you tell which is which? Unless otherwise specified, the powdered “Cinnamon” you find in stores is likely Cassia. You can more easily spot the difference between Ceylon and Cassia when they’re in their whole bark forms. Cassia is thick, hard, darker, and curls in on its self, while Ceylon Cinnamon is lighter, more brittle, and comes rolled up like a cigar. I get my Ceylon Cinnamon at International shops and in bulk at my local Co-op. It’s sweetness is perfect for low carb, sugar-free recipes.

IMG_8056

Recipe for two lattes:

  • 2 cups strong black coffee (I always use coldbrew)
  • 3 tablespoons high quality walnut oil
  • 1 teaspoon powdered Ceylon Cinnamon
  • local raw honey (optional, substitute maple syrup if vegan)

Method:

  1. Blend all of the ingredients on high until creamy
  2. While this is equally good hot, I prefer iced coffee: pour over ice cubes and enjoy with a sweetie, or as an act of sweetness towards yourself.

Note: for a fresh cuppa at another time simply re-blend!

“As we become purer channels for God’s light, we develop an appetite for the sweetness that is possible in this world.” ~ Marianne Williamson

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Real Cinnamon Walnut Latte

  1. Thanks for this, Kat! Having run out of nuts for homemade nut (usually walnut) milk, I was looking for coffee alternatives that wouldn’t tear up my stomach (aye, acid!). I enjoyed this *so* much more than coconut oil coffee–and no reflux! This may just become my new morning cuppa!

    1. I’m so glad you enjoyed this & it’s been kind to your body! Coconut oil can give me a funny tummy too, so I was delighted to discover how good other oils can be in coffees. Thanks for trying it! Xx Kat

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s